Winter concerts and your toddler.

It is difficult trying to hear and enjoy a seasonal concert with toddlers hooting, woohoing, chirping and vocalizing.

And --

NEWS FLASH: Your toddler doesn't enjoy being at any two hour concert, even though its listening to Uncle Ralphie, Daddy or Pop-pop in any venue for two hours. 

Do your kid and the rest of the audience a favor. Leave the kid home. If you can't find a sitter, leave the kid home anyway and just go to the concert by yourself.

There. I've fulfilled my annual responsibility of being a curmudgeon. Don't ask anything more of me.


Assuming you were at the glee club holiday show last night. 

If you're toddler starts wailing during the music, I think you have an obligation to take the kid out of the room.    


Formerlyjerseyjack said:

It is difficult trying to hear and enjoy a seasonal concert with toddlers hooting, woohoing, chirping and vocalizing.

And --

NEWS FLASH: Your toddler doesn't enjoy being at any two hour concert, even though its listening to Uncle Ralphie, Daddy or Pop-pop in any venue for two hours. 

Do your kid and the rest of the audience a favor. Leave the kid home. If you can't find a sitter, leave the kid home anyway and just go to the concert by yourself.

There. I've fulfilled my annual responsibility of being a curmudgeon. Don't ask anything more of me.

It is OK to try to accustom your toddler to attending performances and social events as long as you are prepared to give the toddler a time out or take them home if they are preventing others from enjoying the event.  There are performances aimed at young children which may be a good place to start.


bub said:

Assuming you were at the glee club holiday show last night. 

If you're toddler starts wailing during the music, I think you have an obligation to take the kid out of the room.    

 The problem is, when the kid starts up, the rest of the audience is now distracted from the performance. The audience should not have to experience this in the first place.

Ok. The price is only $10.00. Would you take your toddler to the Metropolitan Opera or N.Y Phil? If you take your toddler to the Maplewood Theater, ushers will ask you to take the kid outside. But I don't know if this happens because I have never seen a toddler in the movie house. Because parents know it is not acceptable.

Well, it should not be acceptable at a local concert performance.

I know they're cute, but leave 'em home.


joan_crystal said:

It is OK to try to accustom your toddler to attending performances and social events as long as you are prepared to give the toddler a time out or take them home if they are preventing others from enjoying the event.  There are performances aimed at young children which may be a good place to start.

 Not so. In order to determine when it is time for a "time out" or trip home, the rest of the audience AND THE PERFORMERS must first be distracted.

I recall, when I was in a choir, singing High Mass. We practiced for hours. During the performance, audience members would be coughing. It was distracting and ruined the recordings that were being made. But that was at a church and half the people were probably dragged their anyway and didn't want to be there.

A performance aimed at toddlers is a different thing.


If the concert is being recorded, I would agree with you.


On a slightly different note ( grin), if you're recording your darling performer, please don't hold your phone up right in front of my face for long periods.  You never know, I might be wanting to see one of the performers, too.


Remarkable that a parent is so clueless that they would remain in a concert with a noisy toddler.


More remarkable, is bringing the kid to the concert in the first place.

One dolt was trying to settle the kid down. So we got to listen to the kid AND dad.

Entitled much?


Formerlyjerseyjack said:

More remarkable, is bringing the kid to the concert in the first place.

One dolt was trying to settle the kid down. So we got to listen to the kid AND dad.

Entitled much?

 I remember when my son was that age. We would hightail it out of any group situation the moment he started to act up. Though I would never have brought him to a concert.


Yeah, I remember one guy in the back having a running conversation with his daughter for almost the entire two hours...



Please, you people need to get over yourselves – okay, boomer? Sorry but the Maplewood Glee Club is not opera at the MET - and the ticket price reflects that, as well as the performance space - which is the exceptionally child-friendly space of St. Joseph Church. Part of the performance includes audience participation in terms of clapping or snapping of fingers, and there’s even a sing-a long. Again, this is not the MET. This is a community event, and the community shows up and pays to be there. These concerts are the perfect place to teach children how to attend concerts. There will always be one or two parents who take their noisy children out of the sanctuary space a little less quickly than the curmudgeons want them to but seriously, just suck it up. 

There was a huge crowd at the concert yesterday – and I’m sure the Glee Club made a pretty penny with ticket sales – so think really hard before you suggest banning young children - and maybe talk it over with the Glee Club. I observed many parents of young children working very hard for the entire concert to keep their children quiet and as engaged as possible just so they could with watch grandpa, or uncle whatever sing. The appropriate attitude towards these parent should be gratitude – grateful that they value their relatives enough to take their kids, grateful that they value music enough to teach their kids to sit through concerts, and grateful that they value our community enough to pay to bring their children it this concert.

And for the record, the Glee Club's FaceBook page describes them thus: "Our group is about fun, fellowship, good singing, and community."  What kind of community does not include children?   

If you want a pristine recording of their singing art, book a studio.  


finnegan said:

Please, you people need to get over yourselves – okay, boomer? Sorry but the Maplewood Glee Club is not opera at the MET - and the ticket price reflects that, as well as the performance space - which is the exceptionally child-friendly space of St. Joseph Church. Part of the performance includes audience participation in terms of clapping or snapping of fingers, and there’s even a sing-a long. Again, this is not the MET. This is a community event, and the community shows up and pays to be there. These concerts are the perfect place to teach children how to attend concerts. There will always be one or two parents who take their noisy children out of the sanctuary space a little less quickly than the curmudgeons want them to but seriously, just suck it up. 

There was a huge crowd at the concert yesterday – and I’m sure the Glee Club made a pretty penny with ticket sales – so think really hard before you suggest banning young children - and maybe talk it over with the Glee Club. I observed many parents of young children working very hard for the entire concert to keep their children quiet and as engaged as possible just so they could with watch grandpa, or uncle whatever sing. The appropriate attitude towards these parent should be gratitude – grateful that they value their relatives enough to take their kids, grateful that they value music enough to teach their kids to sit through concerts, and grateful that they value our community enough to pay to bring their children it this concert.

And for the record, the Glee Club's FaceBook page describes them thus: "Our group is about fun, fellowship, good singing, and community."  What kind of community does not include children?   

If you want a pristine recording of their singing art, book a studio.  

 wrong.

Among many things that you said that are wrong, the most egregious concerns how you teach children to sit through a concert.  If you've got a child, of any age, that is being disruptive at a concert, you take them out. You don't let them sit there and disrupt the experience for the rest of the audience. What are you teaching them if you do that? How to be an a$$h***?

This is such obvious common sense I find it hard to believe I have to actually say it.

And can you be any more dismissive and disrespectful than saying this?

"Sorry but the Maplewood Glee Club is not opera at the MET"

I'm pretty sure that you are neither a parent or a performer. If you are, I doubt you're good at either.

ETA:

I have to admit that my first read through your post was just a quick scan. Now having read it more thoroughly I have even less respect for your position. No one here has suggested banning children from concerts. The number of strawmen you killed in your post is alarming.


finnegan said:

Please, you people need to get over yourselves – okay, boomer? Sorry but the Maplewood Glee Club is not opera at the MET - and the ticket price reflects that, as well as the performance space - which is the exceptionally child-friendly space of St. Joseph Church. Part of the performance includes audience participation in terms of clapping or snapping of fingers, and there’s even a sing-a long. Again, this is not the MET. This is a community event, and the community shows up and pays to be there. These concerts are the perfect place to teach children how to attend concerts. There will always be one or two parents who take their noisy children out of the sanctuary space a little less quickly than the curmudgeons want them to but seriously, just suck it up. 

There was a huge crowd at the concert yesterday – and I’m sure the Glee Club made a pretty penny with ticket sales – so think really hard before you suggest banning young children - and maybe talk it over with the Glee Club. I observed many parents of young children working very hard for the entire concert to keep their children quiet and as engaged as possible just so they could with watch grandpa, or uncle whatever sing. The appropriate attitude towards these parent should be gratitude – grateful that they value their relatives enough to take their kids, grateful that they value music enough to teach their kids to sit through concerts, and grateful that they value our community enough to pay to bring their children it this concert.

And for the record, the Glee Club's FaceBook page describes them thus: "Our group is about fun, fellowship, good singing, and community."  What kind of community does not include children?   

If you want a pristine recording of their singing art, book a studio.  

 And seriously, you have to attack the chorus itself???

Not opera???  Get over YOURSELF Boomer!!!


In all fairness, the specific event you are referring to was advertised as being family friendly, which is often code for bring the kids.  Concerts I have attended which are being recorded are advertised as "we will be recording please do not bring young children."  While I agree with the above statements that disruptive children should be removed from the room ASAP so others can enjoy the concert and so concert ca be recorded without incident, perhaps the Men's Glee Club should reconsider its marketing/publicity for next year if they don't want young children to attend.


finnegan said:

 "These concerts are the perfect place to teach children how to attend concerts. "

FJJ: The kids in question, are toddlers. You ain't teaching them nuthin'. The concert was 2 hours long. Classes in schools are no longer than 50 minutes because that is the attention span of a MIDDLE SCHOOL kid. Take your toddler to a concert and the kid is going to disrupt. No if's and's.  Leave your little darling home.

"- and maybe talk it over with the Glee Club."

FJJ: I only spoke with one Glee Club performer who would be happy if TODDLERS were left home.

"I observed many parents of young children working very hard for the entire concert to keep their children quiet and as engaged as possible just so they could with watch grandpa, or uncle whatever sing. "

FJJ: This comment does not address the entitled parent who stayed in the venue, talking to his disruptive tyke. And Maplewood does have its share of entitled people. Look at the threads about entitled driving and parking.


 and for the record, I am not a boomer. But that's ok. When one's argument is without substance, best to resort to name calling.


More like meme calling than name calling. And more substance than some other comments.

As usual, Joan hits the sweet spot.


The sweet spot is a bit sour, if you ask me, as it assumes the Glee Club doesn't want children to attend. Did a member of the Glee Club state that here in this thread somewhere? To assume they don't want children, and then to suggest they alter their marketing, is to place some of the blame on the Glee Club when it's not warranted. I'm pretty sure all they want is a reasonably well-behaved audience, hopefully populated by responsible parents. That's not much to ask for.


drummerboy said:

The sweet spot is a bit sour, if you ask me

I didn’t.


"Family friendly" may be code for "kids are welcome," but it doesn't mean you treat the venue like your living room. If your kid is disrupting the enjoyment of others or distracting the performers then take the kid out of the room. If based on past behavior you think your kid might be disruptive then either leave him home with a sitter, or at least if at all possible sit where you can make a quick getaway. And then make that getaway if needed. this is just  common courtesy, something that is in ever-shorter supply.


I was not there but based on what reasonable people are saying this was a bit over the top. it is not fair for the other people including other kids, and especially unfair for the performers who worked very hard to to put on a good show.


We're just talking bout good judgment and common sense here.  There's a difference btwn bringing a six year old and a baby or toddler to an event. And it depends on the event.  When you go to a Disney cartoon, you expect half the audience to be shouting or whining.  The price tag for the glee club show is mercifully cheap and it may not be risque adults-only material but its not really a little kiddie event either, its fine music.  If you want to take the chance and bring a really little one to something like that, get up and leave soon as the screaming starts.   Simple.


DaveSchmidt said:

drummerboy said:

The sweet spot is a bit sour, if you ask me

I didn’t.

tough noogies.

not fair blaming the glee club for anything here.


If one chooses to pay admission to a concert, or for that matter, pays to eat in a restaurant, they should expect a degree of courtesy from fellow patrons. It’s that simple. However, there are concerts and restaurants where one can predict a looser code of conduct, so to speak. That seems to be  the case here. I don’t think any parent actually wants their child to behave badly at public events and I applaud those who at least attempted to teach audience manners. Maybe those kiddies will be more attentive next time.


A couple of parents with tykes, chose to sit in front of the venue. When their kids acted up, that meant a minute or two or five noisy minutes before the parent could exit into the lobby.

Then, since it was cold outside, they stood in the lobby with their kids. Kid's voices could still be heard inside the venue.

And again, there was the parent who chose to spend the time his seat, telling the kid to be quiet. -can't expect him to take the kid outside. After all, he paid $10 for his ticket. Nuts to everyone else.


annielou said:

If one chooses to pay admission to a concert, or for that matter, pays to eat in a restaurant, they should expect a degree of courtesy from fellow patrons. It’s that simple. However, there are concerts and restaurants where one can predict a looser code of conduct, so to speak. That seems to be  the case here. I don’t think any parent actually wants their child to behave badly at public events and I applaud those who at least attempted to teach audience manners. Maybe those kiddies will be more attentive next time.

 My last comment on this.  Agree that there are events where one can predict a looser code of conduct but this isn't one of them.  It's an overwhelmingly adult, attentive audience every year.  It's not Yanni's Christmas show or the circus.  


bub said:

 My last comment on this.  Agree that there are events where one can predict a looser code of conduct but this isn't one of them.  It's an overwhelmingly adult, attentive audience every year.  It's not Yanni's Christmas show or the circus.  

 And my final comment (unless someone cranks me off).

News flash: Your toddler doesn't want to be there for two hours. In fact, your toddler doesn't want to be there at all.


Friend, the flyer said family friendly.  Why are you beating parents up for wanting to take their kids to an event like this?  They marketed to parents and they came. Perhaps you need to stop attending family friendly events. Problem solved?


bigorangesplotmpwd said:

Friend, the flyer said family friendly.  Why are you beating parents up for wanting to take their kids to an event like this?  They marketed to parents and they came. Perhaps you need to stop attending family friendly events. Problem solved?

No one is "beating parents up for wanting to take their kids to an event like this". They are beating up parents who don't know how to raise their kids and thereby ruin an experience for everyone else.

This is not hard to follow.


drummerboy said:

No one is "beating parents up for wanting to take their kids to an event like this". They are beating up parents who don't know how to raise their kids and thereby ruin an experience for everyone else.

This is not hard to follow.

So taking kids to a family friendly Xmas sing along and trying to keep their kids quiet so as not to annoy others means they don’t know how to raise their kids?  Hmm, that’s a bit much. 



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