NY waiting for Cuomo to sign bill to ban declawing cats! It would be the first state.

Morganna

The bill to ban declawing passed congress and is waiting for Gov. Cuomo's signature. Many vets have fought this bill but

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/04/nyregion/cats-declawing-law-ban.html


Michael

about time and I hope NJ passes similar legislation.  


Rob_Sandow
Morganna said:
The bill to ban declawing passed congress and is waiting for Gov. Cuomo's signature. Many vets have fought this bill but
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/04/nyregion/cats-declawing-law-ban.html

Ok just playing devil's advocate here.  How many cats will die because of this?  About 30 years ago, I adopted a shelter cat who was incorrigible.  I didn't care that he scratched the furniture, but he scratched people, all the time.  My forearms looked like a war zone most of the time, because he would get nasty and aggressive while being petted.  One day he came within an inch of taking out my eye while I was napping on the couch.  I got a big scratch across my forehead.  That was the last straw.  He got declawed, because otherwise he was going back to the pound.  I love cats but I can't risk my health or anyone else's.  I knew he could not ever go outside after that, and I made sure he didn't.  He and I had another 11 good years together before he died.  Years he would not have had if I didn't have that option.  Something to think about.  





 











Morganna
Rob_Sandow said:
Ok just playing devil's advocate here.  How many cats will die because of this?  About 30 years ago, I adopted a shelter cat who was incorrigible.  I didn't care that he scratched the furniture, but he scratched people, all the time.  My forearms looked like a war zone most of the time, because he would get nasty and aggressive while being petted.  One day he came within an inch of taking out my eye while I was napping on the couch.  I got a big scratch across my forehead.  That was the last straw.  He got declawed, because otherwise he was going back to the pound.  I love cats but I can't risk my health or anyone else's.  I knew he could not ever go outside after that, and I made sure he didn't.  He and I had another 11 good years together before he died.  Years he would not have had if I didn't have that option.  Something to think about.  









 











 Happy that you gave him those great years. That is an unusual situation. As someone who has worked in rescue, the reverse is very common.  Many kittens, particularly purebreds, are declawed before they are even given a chance. Many cats without their natural defense become biters. And many avoid the litter box. Those cats are turned into shelters and have little chance of adoption. Most all rescues, including mine put an agreement in the contract that the adopter will not declaw. I have an adopter who opted for those glue on tips.

I was on a rescue site for Persians for a few years and a huge majority were declawed. They are not typically aggressive cats.

I took in an FIV+ male who was declawed and was a bit nippy. He was adopted as a pal for my quarantined FIV+ male who was not declawed. They worked it out.

In your case you had no other choice.

 I recently rescued a kitten with issues. She seemed like a kitten that I could quickly find a home for but tested positive for Feline Leukemia. So quarantined for months with repeated tests, she was one of the few that overcame the virus which would have killed her in 1 - 3 years but she is not well socialized. I'd never adopt her to anyone with children as she often showers me with kisses, then swats. She may not find a home so I'll halt rescue till I work it out. But you make a valid point and perhaps there can be exceptions for aggressive behavior.



mjc

What a pretty kitten!  

Morganna, i was interested in what you said about declawed cats biting.  That fits with our current cat.  Six years ago, we adopted this (then) 6-year-old cat who turned out to be declawed (the humane society didn't know this, but the vet figured it out).  He does bite more than other cats i've had (who were not declawed).  When he was first with us, and everything freaked him out, he bit pretty hard.  Now though, it's more of a token "bite," just a gesture where he touches with his teeth, and if i can catch him when he's just thinking about it a good serious glare and hiss will stop him.  Pretty good cat all around.  He still "scratches" on wicker etc., but it does no damage.  If he had those front claws, parts of our house would be in shreds.

For what it's worth, friends who've declawed their cats recently say it's done with a laser technique now, and their cats were comfortable to jump off furniture (counters, window ledges) later the same day.  Still not sure i could do it though...


Morganna

@mjc, the cat I had years ago was also predictable. He was one of those cats that got overstimulated after a few strokes so the minute he turned his head I knew to cut it out. He had huge teeth!

As for this little girl even if she had no claws she would feel free to bite but we are working on it. I'm very sympathetic because of my experience doing a hoarding rescue in South Orange where almost half the cats were Leukemia positive. I found sanctuaries for them and kept 3 being told they would die in about 9 months from diagnosis. They were wonderful cats and I decided it would be a wonderful albeit short life. The little female lived a year and the 2 boys lived 3 years. I would do it again in a heartbeat.

So when this kitten tested positive, I held my breath through every test, I decided I would do the same for her if she remained positive. She was one of the ones that overcame the virus. You test till they are about 6 months and it was her final test. I had pretty much given up but she had triumphed.  She is very kissy but she must misread signals. She's not made friends with my cats yet but maybe in time.

I had read an Alley Cat Allies article that said cats who were first generation feral, meaning born outside with a tame mother were very tameable but by third generation feral it became difficult. I don't know if they maintain this theory.  Rescuers feel we have the best chance if we get kittens under 8 weeks but many conditions have to be considered. Were they regularly fed by a colony caretaker, were they handled, lots of factors.

Anyway, I thought of the little fairy in Peter Pan who had a bit of  temper and Tinkerbell seemed to suit this little minx so she is named.  There are Siamese mixes in the colony so she has the markings of a flamepoint, orange ears orange striped tail and paws and blue eyes. She's almost a year.






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