Let's talk BURGERS!

jamie

This is something I haven't come close to mastering - would love to get some feedback from the community.

In the past couple years, I've gotten pre-made patties from Trader's or King's.  Usually the higher fat content one.

I know that I should be making the patties yourself.  What meat does everyone recommend?  How thick do you make the patties.

And to me what's even more important is - what rolls do you use?  It seems like many restaurants use brioche rolls.  For the most part, roll that I don't find typically in stored.  I usually end up with potato rolls - which are adequate.

1) Meat
2) Patty size
3) Roll
4) Heat and cook time (preferably on grill)


author
jamie said:
This is something I haven't come close to mastering - would love to get some feedback from the community.
In the past couple years, I've gotten pre-made patties from Trader's or King's.  Usually the higher fat content one.
I know that I should be making the patties yourself.  What meat does everyone recommend?  How thick do you make the patties.
And to me what's even more important is - what rolls do you use?  It seems like many restaurants use brioche rolls.  For the most part, roll that I don't find typically in stored.  I usually end up with potato rolls - which are adequate.

1) Meat
2) Patty size
3) Roll
4) Heat and cook time (preferably on grill)

 Most supermarkets use ground beef that can come from as many as 10 different cows.  Kings comes from 1 and 1 only.  There is a good health factor there.  Buy lower fat content.  Again Kings features 90 or 85 per cent non fat meat.  You can taste the difference.


joy

Pat Lafrieda meat.

While it's much better for your health to go with the 90% lean, the 80% is so much flavorful - split the difference and go with 85%. 


soda

Here's how The (much missed)  Laurel did it...

-s.


jamie

Yes, the Balthazar bun is used at Verjus also - (great burger)!  Anywhere to get those buns locally?


des

My wife has brought home pastries. Give them a call.


https://www.yelp.com/biz/balthazar-bakery-englewood


Red_Barchetta
author said:


jamie said:
This is something I haven't come close to mastering - would love to get some feedback from the community.
In the past couple years, I've gotten pre-made patties from Trader's or King's.  Usually the higher fat content one.
I know that I should be making the patties yourself.  What meat does everyone recommend?  How thick do you make the patties.
And to me what's even more important is - what rolls do you use?  It seems like many restaurants use brioche rolls.  For the most part, roll that I don't find typically in stored.  I usually end up with potato rolls - which are adequate.

1) Meat
2) Patty size
3) Roll
4) Heat and cook time (preferably on grill)
 Buy lower fat content.

 In keeping with standard practice, ignore this advice. 


dave

Verjus had an excellent burger on the menu for lunch.  Maybe they still do?


PetuniaBird

80/20 mix for a juicy burger.  Put it on an onion roll.  https://www.thespruceeats.com/tips-for-perfect-burgers-2216491


Mountainchef

At Least 80/20 ration.  When you go leaner, the burger will be dry and crumbly. Sear in a pan for an even crust, grilling will not give you this.  Brioche bun that has been buttered and heated, much like a grilled cheese exterior.  The butter will form a barrier to keep the wet stuff from making the bun soggy.  The most important step, let the burger rest for a minute or two depending on thickness.



jamie

So apart from Balthazar - anywhere else to get a brioche bun locally?

As for the burger - Flay has it pretty simple:

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/perfect-burger-recipe-1957542

1 1/2 pounds ground chuck (80 percent lean)

Divide the meat into 4 equal portions(about 6 ounces each). Form each portion loosely into a 3/4-inch-thick burger and make a deep depression in the center with your thumb. Season both sides of each burger with salt and pepper.

IF USING A GRILL: Heat a gas grill to high or heat coals in a charcoal grill until they glow bright orange and ash over. Brush the burgers with the oil. Grill the burgers until golden brown and slightly charred on the first side, about 3 minutes for beef and 5 minutes for turkey. Flip over the burgers. Cook beef burgers until golden brown and slightly charred on the second side, 4 minutes for medium rare (3 minutes if topping with cheese; see step 3) or until cooked to desired degree of doneness.



j_r

I like the flat, crispy kind. Here, Sam Sifton discusses those (diner-style) and the fat tavern-style burgers, and how to make them:

https://cooking.nytimes.com/guides/5-how-to-make-burgers


soda
jamie said:
So apart from Balthazar - anywhere else to get a brioche bun locally?
As for the burger - Flay has it pretty simple:
https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/perfect-burger-recipe-1957542
1 1/2 pounds ground chuck (80 percent lean)
Divide the meat into 4 equal portions(about 6 ounces each). Form each portion loosely into a 3/4-inch-thick burger and make a deep depression in the center with your thumb. Season both sides of each burger with salt and pepper.

IF USING A GRILL: Heat a gas grill to high or heat coals in a charcoal grill until they glow bright orange and ash over. Brush the burgers with the oil. Grill the burgers until golden brown and slightly charred on the first side, about 3 minutes for beef and 5 minutes for turkey. Flip over the burgers. Cook beef burgers until golden brown and slightly charred on the second side, 4 minutes for medium rare (3 minutes if topping with cheese; see step 3) or until cooked to desired degree of doneness.



 The Ritz Diner serves outstanding burgers on Brioche buns, which I believe are baked in-house. Ask Marion or George at (973) 533-1213...  

-s.

BTW: Livingston Bagel also uses Brioche buns (not bagels) on its excellent Cheddarburger Platter... call them as well?


jamie

yes, I know where to get good burgers.  This thread is in thr recipes section looking for ingredients to make my own as good as I can at these other places.


soda
jamie said:
yes, I know where to get good burgers.  This thread is in thr recipes section looking for ingredients to make my own as good as I can at these other places.

 I'm trying to help you source Brioche buns, Jamie. Drop the snark, please.

-s.


jamie

snark not intended - I always appreciate your burgers pics.   grin I just want to make what your pictures are showing.


soda

I'm certain you'll do a great job. Some of the best chefs have red hair...   #;0)

-s.


mikescott

I am not a fan of the Brioche buns.  I actually used to get buns from Miller Bakery  --- they actually baked them for a famous burger place and since I had worked at the burger place I was able to get them but had to buy 36 at a time so only did for parties.  They were the best burger buns I ever had.  Not sure if they still make them (was in northern NJ).  


tomcat

Jamie,

I love a good burger too, I agree with the 80/20 or 85/15 choices.  However, I tend to make mine larger, closer to 8 oz each, so I can cook them rare (or 'black-n-blue') for those who prefer them that way.

I detest standard buns, and brioches are not much better.  I actually prefer a Kaiser roll, which has more substance & better crust. 

Lastly, if you would like a more flavorful burger, knead the meat with a little finely minced onion and a dash or two of Worchestershire sauce.



jamie

I came across a brioche roll supplier (when I’m ready) $2.75 a roll at Maison Kaiser in the City.

I think the bread to burger ratio is very key as well.

Kaiser roll may work also, hmm.


author

And for those like me who like burgers but not cooking them

An already established restaurant in the Village restaurant is considering adding the sublime things to his menu.  The recipe he obtained from a sister in Louisiana.  He will be there himself next week.

He briefly offered samples to taste test.  What tops sublime?  I used to service the old Stuft Shirt and once in a while Don's on South Orange Ave.  Both had just   great burgers  This new one is more moist and offers more variety for serving.  Blows any local burger out of the water.  Hope he adds them to his menu.


Heynj

Hoboken Farms in Summit -- and elsewhere, and they're at lots of area farmers' markets -- used to have Balthazar baked goods, and still may. 


lanky

Honestly, y'all are getting it wrong.  You really have to grind your own meat - most ground beef that you buy in grocery stores is ground too fine / small.  If you have a Kitchen-Aid mixer, a simple attachment makes it super-easy.  I've found that a 50-50 blend of short rib and chuck using the biggest-size grinder makes unbelievable burgers.

https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/kitchenaid-stand-mixer-food-grinder-attachment/ 


The_Soulful_Mr_T

Jamie,

For me, I don't like brioche buns. ($2.75 per???) Too much bread. Too much air and egg flavor distracts from the burger. That's why I don't eat sliders. Too much bread. So, when I make my burgers (salt, pepper and a bit of finely chopped onion) I use English muffins as rolls. Much less bread. The burger is the centerpiece, not the bread. Just one man's opinion.


mikescott
The_Soulful_Mr_T said:
Jamie,
For me, I don't like brioche buns. ($2.75 per???) Too much bread. Too much air and egg flavor distracts from the burger. That's why I don't eat sliders. Too much bread. So, when I make my burgers (salt, pepper and a bit of finely chopped onion) I use English muffins as rolls. Much less bread. The burger is the centerpiece, not the bread. Just one man's opinion.

 Agreed..   




lanky

I applaud the use of english muffins.  Also a soft potato roll slightly toasted works fine too.  Brioche is too much.


blackcat

80/20, S/P and few splashes of Worcestershire sauce on a toasted honey wheat English muffin. 


galileo

I use English muffins but they seem small. Then I remember seeing the package of 4 instead of 6. These would be better for the hamburger.


RealityForAll

When cooking in the kitchen in 10" cast iron frying pan, I like to add soy sauce to each burger after one side has browned (I usually turn stove up to max for 3 or 4 minutes before adding burgers and then turn stove to medium when burgers first drop into pan).  In addition, I usually add 1 to 1 1/2 splashes of the soy sauce on top of each burger after searing nicely say 2 or 3 minutes after being placed in pan. After adding soy sauce, I then lower the heat  further to low and put a lid on the frying pan. 

After flipping the burger, I replace the lid with heat still at low  - remember with a cast iron pan there is lots of heat in the pan so the burgers keep cooking nicely despite the stove being on low.  In summary, pan is screaming hot before burgers go in so that you get a good sear, heat is lowered when burgers go in, but burgers cook unabated due to the cast iron pan holding so much heat.  The soy sauce creates a bit salty, sticky coating on the burgers which is delicious.  Bon appetit.


PS I like to use the grass fed beef from Aldi's or Shoprite which is 85 to 90 percent lean.


oots

we use martins potato rolls


concentrate on the meat and cooking 



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