Great outpatient physical therapist following hip replacement?

Who would you recommend that you or someone you know has used for outpatient PT follow-up of a hip replacement.  I know of some local PTs but I'm specifically seeking your experience (or acquaintance's experience) following this specific surgery.  Thanks for your help.

(My surgery went very well, thank you!  Have had a great experience thus far but ready to transition from home visits to outpatient treatment.  And, fair warning: I'll be back on the road next week!)


No recommendation since no direct experience with this.  I do want to extend my congratulations on transitioning so far in such a short period of time and extend my best wishes for a complete recovery ASAP.  


Thanks, Joan.  I've been amazed myself.  I think I had a great doctor (Robert T. Goldman of Tri-County Orthopedics) and a great, albeit brief, stay on the Orthopedic Floor at Morristown Memorial.  I was iimpressed by the nursing/PT/OT and other staff.  And now that I'm well launched into one of the best decades of my life, I am just happy to keep moving forward, on all levels.


The exercises you do will all be fairly similar. You basically need to strengthen the muscles that were cut and regain flexibility. It's not rocket science, so simply pick one of the PTs you know and like and do the home exercises. It's more about your work rather than his or her work.

Congratulations.


Have not had hip surgery, but have had cause for PT for my back and knees and have used Sports Training PT in Millburn. Have found them to be the most 'hands on' PT group I've been to.

They are behind CVS on Millburn Ave.


 That's where I'm going too. Their hours are great I believe 6 AM to 9 PM and they really are hands-on parking is easy

Maybe I'll see you there


My husband adored Beth Casola of Atlantic Health for home visits (used for both hip replacements, 4 years apart); very happy with Andrew Quirk in Maplewood for outpatient after (Beth's Chatham office hours didn't work for him).  


I go to Summit PT, it's not Summit Medical.

One great benefit is that you can use their gym program after you finish treatment.  This means that you pay $20 per visit and can use their PT machines.  No doc's script or appt, just stop by when you're affected area is bothering you.  This is actually quite a benefit.

https://www.facebook.com/SPTNJ/


vermontgolfer said:

Have not had hip surgery, but have had cause for PT for my back and knees and have used Sports Training PT in Millburn. Have found them to be the most 'hands on' PT group I've been to.

They are behind CVS on Millburn Ave.

I went there, and it was fine. My therapist was right out of school, with less than a year of experience. Also, like many other larger PT practices, your therapist is not usually watching you perform your exercises. If you want undivided one-on-one attention, I would think about somebody like Andrew Quirk, who only schedules one patient at a time. No assistants or techs on staff, so far as I know.


LivingLarge said:

The exercises you do will all be fairly similar. You basically need to strengthen the muscles that were cut and regain flexibility. It's not rocket science, so simply pick one of the PTs you know and like and do the home exercises. It's more about your work rather than his or her work.

Congratulations.

Agree with this.  It's not complicated.  Any decent PT will be fine.


LivingLarge said:
vermontgolfer said:

Have not had hip surgery, but have had cause for PT for my back and knees and have used Sports Training PT in Millburn. Have found them to be the most 'hands on' PT group I've been to.

They are behind CVS on Millburn Ave.

I went there, and it was fine. My therapist was right out of school, with less than a year of experience. Also, like many other larger PT practices, your therapist is not usually watching you perform your exercises. If you want undivided one-on-one attention, I would think about somebody like Andrew Quirk, who only schedules one patient at a time. No assistants or techs on staff, so far as I know.

My therapist Amy, has 15 years of experience. 


I called A. Quirk and unfortunately the parking for his practice was too far away for me to walk from. Sports Institute has handicapped parking right outside the door. You DID get a temporary permit, didn't you?


If not, you can get and then file the temporary permit application at the Police Station.  It requires a doctor's signature.  Approval process is pretty quick.


Walking (with crutches, a cane, or unassisted) is a major element of hip-replacement PT. Why bother with a permit?


Because getting in and out of car can be difficult for a while. Because sometimes/days/in certain rainy or snowy weather it is the prudent thing to do to park closer. Because there may be ups and downs in your recovery. 


Thanks for all the input.  Today is my last home PT session so I better get crackin'!

I did get the parking permit, altho my visiting nurse's comment was that I wouldn't really need it.  I know I will prefer to have the option, like at Costco!  


soresident said:

Because getting in and out of car can be difficult for a while. Because sometimes/days/in certain rainy or snowy weather it is the prudent thing to do to park closer. Because there may be ups and downs in your recovery. 

Walking is the single best thing you can do for your recovery. 


Yes, LivingLarge, I know that and my PT has had to slow me down several times in the 2 weeks since my surgery as my tendency is to do more exercise rather than less.   BUT there are times and situations that don't make sense to take a risk on.  So, let me clarify, I will exercise the option for handicapped parking judiciously. Not to worry.


It makes no sense that any office that services people with disabilities does not have adequate parking....even if there is limited handicap parking....that is not adequate as those spaces are not guaranteed.  I once saw someone park in the middle of 2 handicap spaces and go RUNNING up a hill....there was a placard...and maybe she was picking someone up..but....


LivingLarge said:

Walking (with crutches, a cane, or unassisted) is a major element of hip-replacement PT. Why bother with a permit?

 because often parking lots are poorly paved- I just had another fall because of uneven ground...because sometimes the ONLY parking available in a reasonable distance is handicap parking.....because if it is rainy or snowy....and you can't walk good, you may need handicap parking.....because you may need extra room to maneuver with crutches, walker, cane, etc...because you may aggravate the injury and have a set back...maybe the person needs to be able to open the door wide to use it for support to get in and out....or maybe they will be carrying something back to the car and walking and carrying are too hard


I purposely spend extra time walking around supermarkets on the smooth flat floor...using the shopping cart for support...in the parking lots, I don't have the cart and have to be very careful..watching the ground for anything that could make me fall...as well as the cars...I have a permanent placard that I only use as needed....only when there is no regular parking within about 20 spaces on the store...most of the time I use it is in small parking lots where all the regular spaces are being used...and I would have to park down the block on the street


Shout out to Andrew Quirk, Physical Therapist, who has been terrific to work with as I recover from my hip replacement.  Fun conversations while we work.


nakaille said:

Shout out to Andrew Quirk, Physical Therapist, who has been terrific to work with as I recover from my hip replacement.  Fun conversations while we work.

You will never go wrong with Andrew.




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