BEFORE YOU BOOK THAT CRUISE...

mtierney

Caveat Emptor

There is a dark side to cruising  — a reality never acknowledged by cruise lines

My husband  of 63 years  and I loved to travel — especially by sea, as air travel became more uncomfortable and stressful.

In June of 2018, my husband died. A few months later, I noted an advertisement for a February, cruise out of New York City — a destination my husband and I had talked about as a great way to leave winter behind — and no air travel!  On  Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019, I boarded the Norwegian Escape for a 14 day cruise to the Caribbean. I did not know any of the people making the same trip, but believed  I had the security and opportunity to make new friendships along the way.

On Friday, February 8th, five nights out, I went on a ship shore excursion in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. 

At the last stop, the tour group visited a shopping center near the pier. We were taken to a restaurant, and were brought out to a sunny patio to be served Jamaican coffee and banana bread. 

Our group was led out from the patio via the restaurant’s very dark entryway. Many of us, carrying  shopping bags, walked together to where our bus was waiting. I missed a step and tumbled onto the roadway.

 I instinctively held my right arm to break the fall, but I still hitting the right side of my head , right knee, hip and right shoulder . As I tried to sit up, I saw my grossly deformed hand. The pain was intense! No one at the scene called for medical assistance. The bus driver lifted me upright, helped me onto the bus, and, somehow,  got me up the steps and onto a seat.

Brought to the ship’s medical unit,  X-rays were taken of my arm; no other attention or treatment was offered. 

In disbelief, I heard the ship’s medic instruct two crew members to take me back to my stateroom so I could supervise as they packed up all my things hurriedly into my suitcases! I was offered no other options,  I had to get off the boat   NOW!

I was returned to the pier in a wheelchair and put into a taxi, alone, with instructions to the driver to take me  to the Baywest Wellness Center in Montego Bay. The taxi fare to Montego Bay was $150. Cash only. Twice on the journey, the taxi was pulled over. Once it was by military armed men, the second time, by the police. The taxi driver did not explain to me what was going on — terrifying experiences for me.

I was dropped off at this very small clinic by the driver.  After additional X-rays, I was told I had sustained  fractures of the right forearm and wrist.

Asking  what options I had, the doctor said general anesthesia for a open surgical setting , which I rejected, as dangerous at my age even in the best of circumstances. A closed reduction  procedure (Colles) was then done, with  just a  local to the top of my hand.

The pain of closed reduction — each finger of my right hand was tied with a  gauze strip at the base and  pulled outward —as another doctor manually manipulated the bones in my hand, is hard to describe. The procedure was done in a room which appeared to be an office. A third man held me down so I couldn’t move. The reduction was $5,000 and was charged to my credit card upfront. Medicare does not cover medical expenses out of the United States.

I remained  over night, receiving no pain meds , food, or water. Arrangements to find a flight to Newark were made with another couple from New Jersey who  had also been removed from the ship for a suspected health issue. Turns out the man had acid reflux! 

I went to Southern Ocean County Hospital, where I was finally  prescribed pain medicine and an appointment  was made with a orthopedist. And so began my life for the next 9 weeks and four casts later.
 
My  husband and I had enjoyed cruising the world, visiting diverse ports of call., all without incident! I do not recall witnessing or learning of such indignities happening to other passengers. It is, I have learned, a very closely guarded secret!

The whole point of my sharing this story is to alert people and to offer some observations: The mammoth cruise ships  cater very specifically to seniors, who are obviously attracted to a perceived safe and welcoming environment. Many  passengers, young and old, come on board in wheelchairs, scooters, walkers and canes etc. Make sure you know what your travel and or medical insurance covers. But, most importantly, if you become ill or injured, understand that the cruise companies will  quickly get you off the ship.

Do these frail and/or high risk passengers understand the risks the are undertaking?  I think not. I know I did not.


STANV

Did you complain to the cruise line, or if you booked through a travel agency to that agency.

This is a horrible story. They had no right to treat you that way!


proeasdf
mtierney said:

Caveat Emptor
There is a dark side to cruising  — a reality never acknowledged by cruise lines

My husband  of 63 years  and I loved to travel — especially by sea, as air travel became more uncomfortable and stressful.
In June of 2018, my husband died. A few months later, I noted an advertisement for a February, cruise out of New York City — a destination my husband and I had talked about as a great way to leave winter behind — and no air travel!  On  Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019, I boarded the Norwegian Escape for a 14 day cruise to the Caribbean. I did not know any of the people making the same trip, but believed  I had the security and opportunity to make new friendships along the way.
On Friday, February 8th, five nights out, I went on a ship shore excursion in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. 
At the last stop, the tour group visited a shopping center near the pier. We were taken to a restaurant, and were brought out to a sunny patio to be served Jamaican coffee and banana bread. 
Our group was led out from the patio via the restaurant’s very dark entryway. Many of us, carrying  shopping bags, walked together to where our bus was waiting. I missed a step and tumbled onto the roadway.
 I instinctively held my right arm to break the fall, but I still hitting the right side of my head , right knee, hip and right shoulder . As I tried to sit up, I saw my grossly deformed hand. The pain was intense! No one at the scene called for medical assistance. The bus driver lifted me upright, helped me onto the bus, and, somehow,  got me up the steps and onto a seat.
Brought to the ship’s medical unit,  X-rays were taken of my arm; no other attention or treatment was offered. 
In disbelief, I heard the ship’s medic instruct two crew members to take me back to my stateroom so I could supervise as they packed up all my things hurriedly into my suitcases! I was offered no other options,  I had to get off the boat   NOW!
I was returned to the pier in a wheelchair and put into a taxi, alone, with instructions to the driver to take me  to the Baywest Wellness Center in Montego Bay. The taxi fare to Montego Bay was $150. Cash only. Twice on the journey, the taxi was pulled over. Once it was by military armed men, the second time, by the police. The taxi driver did not explain to me what was going on — terrifying experiences for me.
I was dropped off at this very small clinic by the driver.  After additional X-rays, I was told I had sustained  fractures of the right forearm and wrist.
Asking  what options I had, the doctor said general anesthesia for a open surgical setting , which I rejected, as dangerous at my age even in the best of circumstances. A closed reduction  procedure (Colles) was then done, with  just a  local to the top of my hand.
The pain of closed reduction — each finger of my right hand was tied with a  gauze strip at the base and  pulled outward —as another doctor manually manipulated the bones in my hand, is hard to describe. The procedure was done in a room which appeared to be an office. A third man held me down so I couldn’t move. The reduction was $5,000 and was charged to my credit card upfront. Medicare does not cover medical expenses out of the United States.
I remained  over night, receiving no pain meds , food, or water. Arrangements to find a flight to Newark were made with another couple from New Jersey who  had also been removed from the ship for a suspected health issue. Turns out the man had acid reflux! 
I went to Southern Ocean County Hospital, where I was finally  prescribed pain medicine and an appointment  was made with a orthopedist. And so began my life for the next 9 weeks and four casts later.
 
My  husband and I had enjoyed cruising the world, visiting diverse ports of call., all without incident! I do not recall witnessing or learning of such indignities happening to other passengers. It is, I have learned, a very closely guarded secret!
The whole point of my sharing this story is to alert people and to offer some observations: The mammoth cruise ships  cater very specifically to seniors, who are obviously attracted to a perceived safe and welcoming environment. Many  passengers, young and old, come on board in wheelchairs, scooters, walkers and canes etc. Make sure you know what your travel and or medical insurance covers. But, most importantly, if you become ill or injured, understand that the cruise companies will  quickly get you off the ship.
Do these frail and/or high risk passengers understand the risks the are undertaking?  I think not. I know I did not.

I learned a lot from your posting.  I have never been able to pull the trigger on a cruise.  Your description of your trip to Jamaica makes it that much less likely that I will ever pull the trigger on such a cruise.  Best of luck on your recovery.  And, thanks for letting us all know the true skinny on cruise ships overseas.

My chief concerns about cruising (until reading about your experience) have been: 

 i.) Norovirus outbreaks; and 

ii.) lack of lap pools on cruise ships*.

*- I have been told that the average cruise ship pool is about 20'x40'.  Much too small to swim serious laps each day.

PS While on vacation I typically try to swim a minimum of two miles per day which equates to 128 laps in a 25 meter pool.  Swimming the same distance in a 40' pool would involve about double the number of laps.  In addition, swimming the two miles (equivalent to 3520 yards) in a 40' pool likely also include a lot of pushing-off which diminishes the exercise component, likely no lap lane separators due to the short length of the pool, and excessive urine concentration (significantly less gallons of water than your typical Olympic pool and large number of pre-adolescent children).

PPS If anyone knows of a cruise ship with a true Olympic pool with lap lanes, then please let me know.

Norovirus link:  https://abcnews.go.com/US/270-cruise-ship-passengers-sickened-norovirus-royal-caribbean/story?id=60291


Elle_Cee

So sorry that you endured this terrible experience and thank you for sharing it.  I hope you've regained most of the use of your hand and are on the way to full recovery. No cruise ships for me, ever.  This confirms it.  


librarylady

So  sorry for your experience. I have been on least a dozen cruises including one when I was on a walker/cane. After an accident at home that necessitated cancelling

A  trip , I ALWAYS took the very reasonable insurance offered by my agent at Vacations To Go. Probably about $100. If necessary they would have airlifted me to the Mainland. Never been hit with the Norovirus ( kein ahura) and I don’t swim laps

But I love cruising. Again so sorry for your experience. That was terrible to go through


mtierney

I love/loved cruising and have traveled all over the world by sea. So much more civilized than air travel. That said, I shared my experience here to present the underbelly of cruise reality. Of course, insurance is a wise move and we always considered it part of the travel expenses. The cost might be prohibitive, however, to insure every contingency.

Folks have the impression that a ship’s medical unit is there for more than sunburns, bandages, and nausea. It appears quite elegant at a glance. Starchy white uniforms and nurses, spotless exam rooms, etc. It took less than 15 minutes to make the decision that I had to pack up and leave the ship! Surely that experience and the dangerous taxi ride — alone, unescorted —to a poorly equipped wellness center an hour and a half away was not in my best interest.

The ship sailed late from its first port in Florida, skipped the next Grand Caymen port altogether. I was expendable. The ship had to make time.

The most important point to be made is that cruise lines advertise to senior citizens who come aboard with canes, walkers, wheelchairs, electric scooters, oxygen and many medical issues, creating an appeal of safe and caring environment on board. Do they understand the fine print?



Robert_Casotto

never cruised.  never would.


jmitw

maybe you can sell your story to a company that sells medical  insurance for travel.......and be sure to know the location and contact info of EVERY US embassy in EVERY country you will stop in/pass through


weirdbeard
proeasdf said:


mtierney said:

Caveat Emptor
There is a dark side to cruising  — a reality never acknowledged by cruise lines

My husband  of 63 years  and I loved to travel — especially by sea, as air travel became more uncomfortable and stressful.
In June of 2018, my husband died. A few months later, I noted an advertisement for a February, cruise out of New York City — a destination my husband and I had talked about as a great way to leave winter behind — and no air travel!  On  Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019, I boarded the Norwegian Escape for a 14 day cruise to the Caribbean. I did not know any of the people making the same trip, but believed  I had the security and opportunity to make new friendships along the way.
On Friday, February 8th, five nights out, I went on a ship shore excursion in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. 
At the last stop, the tour group visited a shopping center near the pier. We were taken to a restaurant, and were brought out to a sunny patio to be served Jamaican coffee and banana bread. 
Our group was led out from the patio via the restaurant’s very dark entryway. Many of us, carrying  shopping bags, walked together to where our bus was waiting. I missed a step and tumbled onto the roadway.
 I instinctively held my right arm to break the fall, but I still hitting the right side of my head , right knee, hip and right shoulder . As I tried to sit up, I saw my grossly deformed hand. The pain was intense! No one at the scene called for medical assistance. The bus driver lifted me upright, helped me onto the bus, and, somehow,  got me up the steps and onto a seat.
Brought to the ship’s medical unit,  X-rays were taken of my arm; no other attention or treatment was offered. 
In disbelief, I heard the ship’s medic instruct two crew members to take me back to my stateroom so I could supervise as they packed up all my things hurriedly into my suitcases! I was offered no other options,  I had to get off the boat   NOW!
I was returned to the pier in a wheelchair and put into a taxi, alone, with instructions to the driver to take me  to the Baywest Wellness Center in Montego Bay. The taxi fare to Montego Bay was $150. Cash only. Twice on the journey, the taxi was pulled over. Once it was by military armed men, the second time, by the police. The taxi driver did not explain to me what was going on — terrifying experiences for me.
I was dropped off at this very small clinic by the driver.  After additional X-rays, I was told I had sustained  fractures of the right forearm and wrist.
Asking  what options I had, the doctor said general anesthesia for a open surgical setting , which I rejected, as dangerous at my age even in the best of circumstances. A closed reduction  procedure (Colles) was then done, with  just a  local to the top of my hand.
The pain of closed reduction — each finger of my right hand was tied with a  gauze strip at the base and  pulled outward —as another doctor manually manipulated the bones in my hand, is hard to describe. The procedure was done in a room which appeared to be an office. A third man held me down so I couldn’t move. The reduction was $5,000 and was charged to my credit card upfront. Medicare does not cover medical expenses out of the United States.
I remained  over night, receiving no pain meds , food, or water. Arrangements to find a flight to Newark were made with another couple from New Jersey who  had also been removed from the ship for a suspected health issue. Turns out the man had acid reflux! 
I went to Southern Ocean County Hospital, where I was finally  prescribed pain medicine and an appointment  was made with a orthopedist. And so began my life for the next 9 weeks and four casts later.
 
My  husband and I had enjoyed cruising the world, visiting diverse ports of call., all without incident! I do not recall witnessing or learning of such indignities happening to other passengers. It is, I have learned, a very closely guarded secret!
The whole point of my sharing this story is to alert people and to offer some observations: The mammoth cruise ships  cater very specifically to seniors, who are obviously attracted to a perceived safe and welcoming environment. Many  passengers, young and old, come on board in wheelchairs, scooters, walkers and canes etc. Make sure you know what your travel and or medical insurance covers. But, most importantly, if you become ill or injured, understand that the cruise companies will  quickly get you off the ship.
Do these frail and/or high risk passengers understand the risks the are undertaking?  I think not. I know I did not.
Click to Read More
mtierney said:

Caveat Emptor
There is a dark side to cruising  — a reality never acknowledged by cruise lines

My husband  of 63 years  and I loved to travel — especially by sea, as air travel became more uncomfortable and stressful.
In June of 2018, my husband died. A few months later, I noted an advertisement for a February, cruise out of New York City — a destination my husband and I had talked about as a great way to leave winter behind — and no air travel!  On  Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019, I boarded the Norwegian Escape for a 14 day cruise to the Caribbean. I did not know any of the people making the same trip, but believed  I had the security and opportunity to make new friendships along the way.
On Friday, February 8th, five nights out, I went on a ship shore excursion in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. 
At the last stop, the tour group visited a shopping center near the pier. We were taken to a restaurant, and were brought out to a sunny patio to be served Jamaican coffee and banana bread. 
Our group was led out from the patio via the restaurant’s very dark entryway. Many of us, carrying  shopping bags, walked together to where our bus was waiting. I missed a step and tumbled onto the roadway.
 I instinctively held my right arm to break the fall, but I still hitting the right side of my head , right knee, hip and right shoulder . As I tried to sit up, I saw my grossly deformed hand. The pain was intense! No one at the scene called for medical assistance. The bus driver lifted me upright, helped me onto the bus, and, somehow,  got me up the steps and onto a seat.
Brought to the ship’s medical unit,  X-rays were taken of my arm; no other attention or treatment was offered. 
In disbelief, I heard the ship’s medic instruct two crew members to take me back to my stateroom so I could supervise as they packed up all my things hurriedly into my suitcases! I was offered no other options,  I had to get off the boat   NOW!
I was returned to the pier in a wheelchair and put into a taxi, alone, with instructions to the driver to take me  to the Baywest Wellness Center in Montego Bay. The taxi fare to Montego Bay was $150. Cash only. Twice on the journey, the taxi was pulled over. Once it was by military armed men, the second time, by the police. The taxi driver did not explain to me what was going on — terrifying experiences for me.
I was dropped off at this very small clinic by the driver.  After additional X-rays, I was told I had sustained  fractures of the right forearm and wrist.
Asking  what options I had, the doctor said general anesthesia for a open surgical setting , which I rejected, as dangerous at my age even in the best of circumstances. A closed reduction  procedure (Colles) was then done, with  just a  local to the top of my hand.
The pain of closed reduction — each finger of my right hand was tied with a  gauze strip at the base and  pulled outward —as another doctor manually manipulated the bones in my hand, is hard to describe. The procedure was done in a room which appeared to be an office. A third man held me down so I couldn’t move. The reduction was $5,000 and was charged to my credit card upfront. Medicare does not cover medical expenses out of the United States.
I remained  over night, receiving no pain meds , food, or water. Arrangements to find a flight to Newark were made with another couple from New Jersey who  had also been removed from the ship for a suspected health issue. Turns out the man had acid reflux! 
I went to Southern Ocean County Hospital, where I was finally  prescribed pain medicine and an appointment  was made with a orthopedist. And so began my life for the next 9 weeks and four casts later.
 
My  husband and I had enjoyed cruising the world, visiting diverse ports of call., all without incident! I do not recall witnessing or learning of such indignities happening to other passengers. It is, I have learned, a very closely guarded secret!
The whole point of my sharing this story is to alert people and to offer some observations: The mammoth cruise ships  cater very specifically to seniors, who are obviously attracted to a perceived safe and welcoming environment. Many  passengers, young and old, come on board in wheelchairs, scooters, walkers and canes etc. Make sure you know what your travel and or medical insurance covers. But, most importantly, if you become ill or injured, understand that the cruise companies will  quickly get you off the ship.
Do these frail and/or high risk passengers understand the risks the are undertaking?  I think not. I know I did not.
I learned a lot from your posting.  I have never been able to pull the trigger on a cruise.  Your description of your trip to Jamaica makes it that much less likely that I will ever pull the trigger on such a cruise.  Best of luck on your recovery.  And, thanks for letting us all know the true skinny on cruise ships overseas.
My chief concerns about cruising (until reading about your experience) have been: 
 i.) Norovirus outbreaks; and 
ii.) lack of lap pools on cruise ships*.

*- I have been told that the average cruise ship pool is about 20'x40'.  Much too small to swim serious laps each day.
PS While on vacation I typically try to swim a minimum of two miles per day which equates to 128 laps in a 25 meter pool.  Swimming the same distance in a 40' pool would involve about double the number of laps.  In addition, swimming the two miles (equivalent to 3520 yards) in a 40' pool likely also include a lot of pushing-off which diminishes the exercise component, likely no lap lane separators due to the short length of the pool, and excessive urine concentration (significantly less gallons of water than your typical Olympic pool and large number of pre-adolescent children).
PPS If anyone knows of a cruise ship with a true Olympic pool with lap lanes, then please let me know.
Norovirus link:  https://abcnews.go.com/US/270-cruise-ship-passengers-sickened-norovirus-royal-caribbean/story?id=60291

 Most cruise ship pools (and hot tubs) are just oversized bathtubs packed with little kids every single minute they are open, that no adult swimming alone could ever enjoy.  There's usually no room to swim more than 2 feet in a straight line.  They are also closed, drained and refilled several seemingly random times over the course of the day.  The only exception could be a pool on an adult-only deck, which some ships have.  However, any pool on that deck would likely be even smaller.


annielou

Cruised once. Never again. They’re floating shopping malls/gambling casinos wrapped up in too many shared germs. And you’re trapped there. Ugh.


Formerlyjerseyjack
weirdbeard said:
 Most cruise ship pools (and hot tubs) are just oversized bathtubs packed with little kids every single minute they are open, that no adult swimming alone could ever enjoy.  There's usually no room to swim more than 2 feet in a straight line.  They are also closed, drained and refilled several seemingly random times over the course of the day.  The only exception could be a pool on an adult-only deck, which some ships have.  However, any pool on that deck would likely be even smaller.

 If you see a kid in the pool, standing still, looking up at the sky, trying to look inconspicuous, you know what he is doing.... and if you see bubbles, run like hell.


conandrob240

I’m sorry for what happened to you but I think you are way off base with some of this. First of all, you need to always travel with trip insurance especially on a cruise. Medical evacuation alone could ruin your finances forever if no insurance. Second, I don’t think most people think a cruise has full medical services. How could it? They are sort of like a basic walk in clinic- they can’t treat anything serious. Third, a cruise ship of 4000 people can’t wait for one injured person. It’s ridiculous to think they can do anything but put you off the ship if you are in need of extensive medical treatment. Fourth, you could have and should have controlled your own medical care better. You were in a third world country. Your options could have also included getting the next flight back to the US to be treated. Don’t let people herd you like cattle- take control. Since it wasn’t life threatening, there’s no way I would have had a procedure or surgery like that in Jamaica. Fly home. Jamaica has been under increased travel warnings lately and military stops of vehicles are very common there. 

Last- use a TA! If you didn’t know about much of the above, a good TA would have helped you through this ordeal and made you aware of some of this ahead of time)


Klinker
conandrob240 said:
I’m sorry for what happened to you but I think you are way off base with some of this. First of all, you need to always travel with trip insurance especially on a cruise. Medical evacuation alone could ruin your finances forever if no insurance. Second, I don’t think most people think a cruise has full medical services. How could it? They are sort of like a basic walk in clinic- they can’t treat anything serious. Third, a cruise ship of 4000 people can’t wait for one injured person. It’s ridiculous to think they can do anything but put you off the ship if you are in need of extensive medical treatment. Fourth, you could have and should have controlled your own medical care better. You were in a third world country. Your options could have also included getting the next flight back to the US to be treated. Don’t let people herd you like cattle- take control. Since it wasn’t life threatening, there’s no way I would have had a procedure or surgery like that in Jamaica. Fly home. Jamaica has been under increased travel warnings lately and military stops of vehicles are very common there. 
Last- use a TA! If you didn’t know about much of the above, a good TA would have helped you through this ordeal and made you aware of some of this ahead of time)

 Conandrob hits the nail on the head.  The cruise company is a transportation provider, not your social worker.  I would be interested in knowing exactly what the OP thinks the cruise company should have done differently.


spontaneous

I might have tried to word it a little more gently, but basically I agree with what conandrob wrote.  As soon as the OP mentioned the hand being so injured that it was described as being disfigured I knew that this was well beyond the scope of what a cruise ship infirmary could handle.  I’d put a cruise ship infirmary somewhere above a CVS Minute Clinic but lower than an Urgent Care Center.  


j_r
proeasdf said:

PPS If anyone knows of a cruise ship with a true Olympic pool with lap lanes, then please let me know.
Norovirus link:  https://abcnews.go.com/US/270-cruise-ship-passengers-sickened-norovirus-royal-caribbean/story?id=60291

 No advice on cruising (I sail from Venice for the first time this summer, insurance purchased), but @proeasdf, what you want is not a cruise but a Big Blue Swim. Best best best vacation ever.


joanne

I’m just wondering what advice you all have for the passengers on the quarantined measles cruise ship. 


proeasdf
j_r said:


proeasdf said:

PPS If anyone knows of a cruise ship with a true Olympic pool with lap lanes, then please let me know.

 No advice on cruising (I sail from Venice for the first time this summer, insurance purchased), but @proeasdf, what you want is not a cruise but a Big Blue Swim. Best best best vacation ever.

 jr: thanks for the tip on "Big Blue Swim" (never heard of them before).  Sounds exactly like what I am looking for (except I would like to start closer to home - say the Caribbean).



proeasdf
joanne said:
I’m just wondering what advice you all have for the passengers on the quarantined measles cruise ship. 

 Deep prayer.  Because that is about all that is under the control of those cruise passengers (namely, the afflicted, possibly afflicted and the unafflicted).


joanne

Nothing to alleviate symptoms? My, you’re harsh.


j_r
proeasdf said:


 (except I would like to start closer to home - say the Caribbean).


 You may want to check out SwimTrek, then. I've heard only good things.


spontaneous
joanne said:
I’m just wondering what advice you all have for the passengers on the quarantined measles cruise ship. 

 Two doses of the MMR are listed as being 97% effective.  If I were on the quarantined ship I wouldn’t panic as I had my MMR booster a little less than 9 years ago


conandrob240

quarantine can happen on a ship. It’s rare but it can happen. If you’ve been properly vaccinated, I’m not sure I’d be too concerned. Annoyed? Maybe. This is probably where I’d sit back and enjoy the extra days of the unlimited drink package! 


joanne

300people cooped up for an extra 10-12 days on 440ft of ship. Yep, sounds like heaven. Not.

Anyway, just read they’ve been allowed to leave port and move to the next island.

.


susan1014
proeasdf said:


joanne said:
I’m just wondering what advice you all have for the passengers on the quarantined measles cruise ship. 
 Deep prayer.  Because that is about all that is under the control of those cruise passengers (namely, the afflicted, possibly afflicted and the unafflicted).

What makes this particularly interesting is that the ship is owned by Scientology, and used for their most advanced level of training....


proeasdf
joanne said:
Nothing to alleviate symptoms? My, you’re harsh.

 Does the average quarantined passenger (namely, the afflicted, possibly afflicted and the unafflicted) have anything with them to alleviate symptoms?


Not as far as I know.   When was the last time you took serum globulin (often prevents measles or reduces symptoms) and a hypodermic needle on your vacation with you?


See:  https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/measles/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20374862

PS No harshness here.  Just saying that most quarantined passengers lack the proper items on vacation to reduce symptoms (other than aspirin/Advil for fever reduction - which, of course, I would endorse using to reduce fever) or to reduce chance of measles transmission to them or their family.

PPS However, for most of these quarantined passengers there is little under their control.




Red_Barchetta
joanne said:
I’m just wondering what advice you all have for the passengers on the quarantined measles cruise ship. 

 If you're referring to the Scientology ship, whatever advice any of us have won't matter.  They are essentially prisoners / slaves so their problems are much worse than having the Measles.  Until this government opens its' eyes and does something about the religion in general there's nothing any of us can do.  


mtierney

On another blog, my account brought comments more along this line....


“OMG Michael & I can't believe the horror you Have experienced by an uncaring, heartless cruise line.  It sickens my stomach to think you were treated without any compassion at all.  We pray you are healing properly and will soon be restored to good health!   Thank you for sharing & making people aware of the dangers out there for the unsuspecting.“


I put this story out there in an effort to educate and inform, not to look for compassion from those folks who are irredeemable in their opinions toward me personally. 

It took guts on my part, but I needed to present this story to the greater majority of cruisegoers who have no clue that cruise lines dump off folks like yesterday’s spoiled food.

For people who shoot from the hip and have reading retention issues. Let me restate:

I have traveled the world via plane train, auto and ship. We always traveled with insurance — not the extremely costly plans which would have airlifted us back home — my insurance would have paid for an ambulance to a hospital. The wellness center was far less equipped than the ship’s facility, but I was rushed off the ship into the back seat of an old taxi/car, for an  1-1/2 hour long trip — surely not advisable for me under the circumstances.

Always traveled with a travel agency to work out the details.

I was also advised trying to fly home with an unset broken arm was dangerous to me if an airline would even give me a ticket. There were no direct flights  that evening. Taking a plane, which would make several stops and take twice or more as long, was not an option.

So please accept this as a heads up, not a pity party.




Smedley
Robert_Casotto said:
never cruised.  never would.

 I'll tell the cruise lines not to expect you lol


ridski
joanne said:
I’m just wondering what advice you all have for the passengers on the quarantined measles cruise ship. 

 Stay away from Scientology.



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